North Carolina Saves

North Carolina Saves—an initiative of The Collaborative—is a statewide campaign to encourage North Carolinians to start small, think BIG with their savings! Establishing healthy savings habits is the key to turning dreams into reality.

Throughout the state, people are learning the value in saving money along ways to save, from building credit and paying down debt, to budgeting and investing. 

Take the North Carolina Saves Pledge


Savings Strategies:

Building wealth starts when you set a goal and make a plan to reach that goal. Whatever goal you choose – whether it’s buying a car, buying a house, or getting out from under your debts – learn about proven savings strategies and get simple tips on the best ways to save. Click on the links below to learn how to:


About Us

The Collaborative is a non-profit organization promoting economic security for North Carolina families through savings and financial education programs.
www.cultureofsavings.org.

 

RSS Recent Blog Entries View all »

  • 5 Ways To Teach Kids How To Save At Home

    We start kids young with almost everything— sports, school, so why not saving? We are always looking for new ways to #ThinkLikeASaver in the America Saves community. The earlier that you have a positive mindset around saving, the easier it is to save successfully as an adult.

    Read more...
  • Creating a budget for your family

    It’s always the right time to create a saving and spending plan (aka a budget). It’s also a good idea to revisit that plan annually or when a major shift occurs in your income or expenses. 

    We’ve created an easy to use, but thorough, Spending and Saving Plan tool to use. Before you get started, here are some tips to help you #ThinkLikeASaver, ensuring that your money is working smarter and harder for you.

    Read more...
  • 4 Steps to Spending Your Stimulus Check Wisely When You Don't Have An Emergency Fund

    Most Americans don't have an emergency fund. While we're all experiencing this pandemic very differently — some having only minor inconveniences and others finding themselves without a job or having to close their business — those without a savings cushion are vulnerable to feeling the ramifications of COVID-19 for a very long time.

    With stimulus checks on the way, there will be tough financial decisions to make once received. Here are active steps you can take, along with things to consider to help you develop a solid spending plan.

    1. Make a list of all expenses

    Write out every single expense that you have, including essentials like food and utilities. Be sure to go through your checking and savings account history to make sure you don't have any “vampire” expenses, like monthly subscriptions that you may have forgotten about and no longer need.

    2. Talk to all creditors and lenders

    The CARES Act puts into effect two mortgage relief provisions: protection from foreclosure, and a right to forbearance (pausing or making partial payments) for those experiencing loss of income due to COVID-19. However, the provisions are not automatic and are only for federal loans, so you MUST talk to your lender.

    If a creditor/lender offers you a payment plan or other relief, make sure you get it in writing and take note of the names and dates of the customer service representatives with whom you speak.

    Thankfully, some utility companies have announced they won't cut off services if they aren't being paid. Be sure you know all of your utility and service providers' stance on this, so there are no surprises. You don't want to make any assumptions.

    RELATED: Your lender might let you miss a few mortgage payments. Three questions you should ask first

    3. Prioritize expenses

    Expenses relating to food, shelter, and medicine should come first. This would include mortgage, rent, utilities, groceries, diapers, and medications. It also includes medical insurance premiums and homeowners/renter's insurance.

    If you need childcare to work, that is another essential expense. Next in line are auto-related expenses, including transportation, gas, insurance premiums, and car payments.

    Loans that are secured by collateral (for example, mortgages and auto loans) are generally considered more important than those without collateral, like consumer credit card debt. For example, if you don't pay your mortgage, a bank can foreclose on your property; if you don't pay your car loan, the bank can seize your car. While not paying your credit card bills will negatively affect your credit score, credit card companies will not come into your house and take your personal possessions.

    Federal student loans are currently not accruing interest until September 30, 2020, and can be put into forbearance so that no payments are due. If you have a private or institutional loan, you will have to contact the lender for other options.

    Remember, if you can afford the minimum payments on your credit cards, then make those payments. It will help to maintain your credit score.

    Expenses for "elective" items, like gym memberships, streaming services, and other subscriptions, come last. Before simply canceling a contract, make sure to contact the vendor – canceling may come with a hefty penalty, but you may be able to temporarily "pause" the service.

    4. Pay your debts in the order of priority

    Now that you know all your expenses, have prioritized them, and know your payment options with creditors and lenders, it's time to make the payments in order of priority.

    It's important to note that we are approaching tax season, so many expect to receive their tax refunds in the coming months. If you plan to receive a refund, you can apply the same process to that extra income.

    If you are still unsure or are overwhelmed with where to start, use our decision tree for guidance on what to do with your stimulus check and tax refund.

    Then make a commitment to be more proactive with saving by taking the America Saves pledge. We'll be your savings accountability partner as you take a small step toward saving.

    Stimulus Decision Tree

    Download Decision Tree: PNG | PDF

    Then make a commitment to be more proactive with saving by taking the America Saves pledge. We'll be your savings accountability partner as you take a small step toward saving.

    Take the America Saves Pledge

  • Pantry Shopping and Meal Planning Preparation Tips

    With experts telling Americans to practice social distancing and to be ready for a possible 14-day self-quarantine one of our first concerns is food. How do we shop and prepare for 14 days worth of meals? Equally important are concerns about shopping without overbuying and staying on a budget.

    Read more...

North Carolina Saves


Partner Resource Packet

Want to share savings messages?

Our Partner Resources Packets include blog, social media, and other content.

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Tip of the Day

  • Keep track of your spending. At least once a month, use credit card, checking, and other records to review what you've purchased. Then, ask yourself if it makes sense to reallocate some of this spending to an emergency savings account. http://ow.ly/sj972

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Saver Tips and Stories View all »

Saving for a Bright Future

Kristin Hendricks, a single mother from Texas, understands the importance of saving money and following a tight budget. She decided to make saving money a priority when she gave birth to her son.

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A Think Like A Saver Attitude

Melissa has always been thrifty with a #ThinkLikeASaver attitude. This served her family well when her husband lost his job in 2014. Using their savings, Melissa’s family stayed afloat while her husband found a new job. During his job search they used a majority of their savings, but that is OKAY. Savings are fluid! They’re supposed to be used in the case of emergency, and this qualified as such.

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Coping with a Lost Job

Aimee Shaffer worked as a Public Service News Director for radio for years until one day her employer downsized the company, resulting in hundreds of lost jobs, including Aimee’s.

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