Young Illinois Saves

Are you ready to take charge of YOUR financial future? Young Illinois Saves is here to help. Did you know that students with a savings account are FOUR times more likely to make it to college and financial pressure is the #1 reason for college drop out? Saving is a big part of making your future goals a reality AND anyone can start saving! You can start with as little as a dollar a day! You just have to put your mind to it, and we are here to help. What are you waiting for?

Join the over 30,000 Illinois students who have pledged to save over $10 million per year!

Take the Young Illinois Saves Pledge


Join the thousands of Illinois students who are making a difference with their money by becoming Young Illinois Savers. Through Young Illinois Saves, you will receive:

  • Opportunity to participate in annual scholarship competitions
  • Free subscription to our quarterly newsletter
  • Free e-mails with tools and resources to help you meet your money goals
  • Free access to college budgeting tool

Student Resources

Building wealth starts when you set a goal and make a plan to reach that goal. Whatever goal you choose – whether it's buying a car, saving for your education, or getting out from under your debts – learn about proven savings strategies and get simple tips on the best ways to save.

Learn more about free, youth banking options in your community! Visit www.Plan2Achieve.org..  She also signed up for direct deposit so that she didn't have to mess around with potentially losing paychecks or running to the bank. 

Create your own College Budget

Check out YIS PR!

View MORE Saver stories in On the Money Magazine!

Check out these Young Illinois Savers' Stories & Saving Tips! 

Jennifer Baeza, One Summer Chicago PayDay Ready Scholarship Winner, with Mayor Rahm Emanuel, City of Chicago

Jennifer is a graduate of the Phoenix Military Academy in Chicago and a sophomore at St. Xavier University majoring in business. Jennifer is the proud daughter of Mexican immigrants and is a first generation college student.

     Jennifer says, "My savings goal for this summer was to be able to buy tickets for my parents to be able to go and visit their hometown Guanajuato, Mexico. My parents sacrifice so much for a total of eight people in a household and I would give them the world if I was able to. They crossed the border to start a better life for their family and buying them tickets to Mexico is the least I can do because they have been with me every step of the way.

     My main tip that I have learned over the summer is to put 20 to 30% of your check into your savings because that is money that can be used in the future for any emergency or any rainy day. This summer I was in a car accident heading to work. If it wasn't for my savings, I would have not been able to do anything at that moment. I was able to fix my car and pay for the hospital bills. It all turned out well in the end because I started saving at a young age."

Jacqueline Sparnicht spent her summer working.  She suddenly needed to make sure that all of the money she was earning throughout the summer was saved into a bank account.

Jackie says, "I believe that my financial experiences this summer will help me achieve my financial goals because this internship provided me with a healthy and steady income. I used receiving this income as an opportunity to implement the things that I have learned from both the financial literacy courses we took as well as the workshops. Specifically, I began budgeting my money from the very beginning. I knew exactly where every check was going. Although that is not as fun, it was a relief when bills were being paid a month or two in advance. By budgeting from the very beginning, I have been on track with due dates, paying an entire credit card off, taking a vacation, and beginning a small savings for expenses to come. I think that my financial goals will be achieved because I was able to establish a sense of discipline when it comes to my income. I have also learned a balance between saving, paying bills and still not cutting myself short—each (of these) things I believe are detrimental to long term financial success."

Thank you for your interest in Young Illinois Saves. 


Contact us!

Tracy Frizzell
Executive Director
Economic Awareness Council
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
(630)740-6831
www.econcouncil.org

 

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