Uncategorised

The True Costs of Having a Baby Part IV: Plan Ahead

Written by Super User · 02 August 2012

August 2, 2012

By Preston Cochrane, President and CEO, AAA Fair Credit Foundation & Utah Saves

This article is part four of a five part series concerning the costs of having a baby.

The True Costs of Having a Baby - Part I: Knowing the Price

The True Costs of Having a Baby - Part II: To Work or Not to Work?

- The True Costs of Having a Baby - Part III: Childcare

Education
When your baby is just learning to smile and grasp your finger, college education may seem too far away to think about. But to fund your child's education, you'll need to amass a large amount of money. If you plan ahead, you'll provide your child with a much wider array of education options.

In the year 2000, tuition for a bachelor's degree program, including housing, at a public university averaged between $20,000 and $50,000. A bachelor's program at a prestigious private university may cost more than $150,000. By the time your child is ready for college, it will be much more than that.

Start a college fund as soon as you can for your child. A small amount invested 18 years in advance will grow to much more than a larger amount saved a year before it's time for college.

Where to Keep Emergency Savings

Emergency Savings
Written by Super User · 29 June 2012


It’s usually best to keep emergency savings in a bank or credit union savings account. These types of accounts offer easier access to your money than certificates of deposit, U.S. Savings Bonds, or mutual funds. Though these are useful tools for long-term saving, they are not ideal for an emergency fund that you may need access to more quickly.

But not too quickly. Keeping your money in a savings account makes it much less likely that you will use these savings to pay for everyday, non-emergency expenses. That’s why it is usually a mistake to keep your emergency fund in a checking account.

You may well need at least $100 to open the savings account and a $200 minimum balance to avoid monthly fees. In most areas, however, there are several financial institutions with lower minimums. Also, banks and credit unions may waive the minimums if you have other accounts at that institution or if you agree to regular, automatic transfers from checking to saving. Your local America Saves campaign can help you find a participating financial institution that offers low- or no-minimum balance savings accounts.

The Best Way to Save for Emergencies

The easiest and most effective way to save is automatically. This is how millions of Americans save at their bank or credit union. Your bank or credit union can help you set up automatic savings by transferring a fixed amount from your checking account to a savings account. Learn more about saving automatically

Learn more:

 

 

 

How to Find Money to Save For Emergencies

Emergency Savings
Written by Super User · 29 June 2012

There are many places to find money to save. Start with the loose change you accumulate. Americans typically save more than $100 in loose change each year. Use this change to open and grow a savings account. If you receive a tax refund or Earned Income Tax Credit, use a portion of this money to begin or increase savings. Since the Tax Credits average nearly $2,000, you may be able to open a savings account and still have plenty of money to pay off debts or cover other expenses.

Try to deposit money saved by cutting back on small, unnecessary expenditures. Need help? Here are more than 50 ideas for reducing spending. These ideas range from packing a lunch, to switching from daily lattes to daily coffees, to not bouncing checks.

Saving money for an emergency fund may be easier if you involve your whole family in meeting this challenge. After you’ve explained the importance of emergency savings to your spouse or children, they may even help build the account. And, they will be more likely to understand why it’s more important for you to increase these savings than to pay for expensive gifts at birthdays or Christmas.

Another way to accumulate the $500 to $1,000 of emergency savings is to ask your bank or credit union to automatically transfer funds from checking to savings monthly. Automatic savings is the easiest savings. What you don’t ever see, you may never miss.

Learn more:

 

 

 

 

Why you should start saving for emergencies

Emergency Savings
Written by Super User · 29 June 2012

Saving for emergencies is, and should be, a top priority for every American. Maintaining an emergency savings account may be the most important difference between those who manage to stay afloat and those who sink in debt. That’s because keeping $500 to $1,000 of savings for emergencies can allow you to easily meet unexpected financial challenges such as:

  • repairing the brakes on your car;
  • buying your child a new pair of needed shoes;
  • replacing a broken window in your house;
  • paying for a visit to the doctor when your child has the flu;
  • covering the dental expense of filling a painful cavity;
  • paying for a parking ticket; or
  • flying to visit a sick parent.

The emergency fund not only provides you with the money to pay for these expenses, it also gives you “peace of mind” knowing that you can afford these types of financial emergencies. Not having an emergency savings fund is one of the reasons many individuals borrow too much money at high interest rates. For example, by saving for emergencies, the twelve million American adults that use payday loans annually would probably not have to take out eight loans of $375 each per year and spend $520 on interest (Pew July, 2012 Study).  

Learn more:

 

 

 

 

Tip of the Day

  • Written by Katie Bryan | November 23, 2013

    Tip to #Save: Pay off Credit Cards as Soon as Possible. http://ow.ly/FJyDM via @Bankrate

Saver Stories View all »

Taking Steps Toward Financial Fitness

Written by Tammy G. Bruzon | November 7, 2014

Nicky Vasquez learned about Virginia Saves when she attended her first class with Bank On Virginia Beach. The instructor shared how important it was to have a written savings goal, and the entire class joined Virginia Saves as the first step toward financial fitness.

Read more...

Learning to Save

Written by Katie Bryan | October 28, 2013

Kisha Barns’s financial situation was undisciplined, unrestricted, and impulsive before she came into contact with her local America Saves campaign, Charlotte Saves.

Read more...

Inspired to Build Savings By Starting Small

Written by Great Lakes Michigan Saves | April 19, 2016

With little-to-no money in the bank and living on a limited income with her adult daughter, Sharon wasn’t sure if building up savings for her future was even possible. “At my age, to put debts behind me would be a relief,” she said, but she wasn’t quite sure how to even get started with a savings plan. That all changed when Sharon attended the Great Lakes Michigan Saves Pay Yourself First Saver’s Summit during America Saves Week.

Read more...