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Saving for Your Future May Be Easier Than You Think

Written by Super User · 06 June 2012

Treasury Savings Options are Affordable, Safe and Convenient Ways to Reach Your Goals

 

June 6, 2012

Source: U.S. Department of the Treasury

 

Do you dream of enjoying a comfortable retirement? Sending your children to college? Buying a new home? Then you know how important it is to save money regularly to reach your goals.  Fortunately, saving for tomorrow may be easier than you think.

The U.S. Department of the Treasury offers safe savings options that can help you take control of your future. Treasury savings options are:

  • Affordable. You don’t need a lot of money to save. You can buy a digital savings bond online for just $25 and other Treasury securities for $100—and there are no fees.
  • Safe. Treasury savings options protect your original principal. In addition, you can safely buy and manage them online through TreasuryDirect—the Treasury Department’s secure, web-based system.
  • Convenient. You can buy and manage Treasury savings options online, 24/7, at the time most convenient for you—no more waiting in line.

Treasury savings options are paperless, so you don’t need to worry about misplacing or storing them. In addition, all of your digital Treasury savings options are accessible in one convenient online location, where you can view account activity such as recent purchases and current values. Plus, if you have existing paper U.S. Savings Bonds, you can convert them to digital bonds 24/7 online at www.treasurydirect.gov.

Visit the Treasury Department’s Ready.Save.Grow. site – www.treasurydirect.gov/readysavegrow – to decide which of the six Treasury savings options may be right for you. Create your free TreasuryDirect account today and build tomorrow’s savings.

Previous Blogs

Money as you Grow. What should kids know about money?

Written by Super User · 31 May 2012

The following post comes from the Military Saves Blog. Follow them on Facebook and Twitter.

May 31, 2012

By Andia Dinesen, AFC ®
Military Saves Coordinator

Kids and money.  Kids and finance.  Kids and saving. Kids and spending. These are things we should all be talking about with our kids, but when? How?  When to talk to your kids about money and how to talk to them about it can be overwhelming and exhausting.  What should your 3 year-old really know about money?  How about your 12 year-old?  Your 18 year-old?  Now, there’s a big challenge.

Once kids are in elementary school, they learn how much coins are worth, how to count them, adding, subtracting, making change; these are all important skills.  While sitting down and counting money with my 1st grader, I wondered.  She is learning the great skill of counting money; does she actually know where the magical coins in the sandwich baggie come from?  If I would have actually asked, chances are her answer would have been, “they came from your purse, Mommy”.  That is not really the answer, unless I also had a magical money-making purse (which would, of course, be fantastic!)

I have to say when I first saw the Money as You Grow interactive webpage at the President’s Advisory Council on Financial Capability meeting a few months ago, I was instantly interested.  I spent the rest of the meeting leaning over and stretching my neck out to see the screens with the mock-up of the website.  I thought, “Now, this is something I can use.”   Just so you know, I am a financial counselor and I am always talking to my daughters about personal finance, but I often wondered, how much is too much?  What is enough?  What should they really know by ages seven and nine?  I don’t want to spend time trying to shove concepts down their throats that they can’t quite grasp.  How tiresome (and boring), for everyone.

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Tip of the Day

  • Written by Administrator2 | January 13, 2014

    Never purchase expensive items on impulse. Think over each expensive purchase for at least 24 hours. Acting on this principle will mean you have far fewer regrets about impulse purchases, and far more money for emergency savings. http://ow.ly/sj972

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